iSchool Capstone

2013

Project Logo

Why Search Twice

Web history supposedly shows users where they have been and finds websites they previously visited. Currently, browsers display web history as a dense, hard-to-read list. This list does not reflect how users use web browsers and does not match the relational way that humans remember. Our research shows that these basic history pages provide little value to users, who are forced to make up for inadequate functionality with bookmarks or memory. Our service takes this underutilized but highly potent data and visualizes it so users can better understand how they use the web. We compile meaningful graphs, trends, and relationships to give users insights into their browsing behavior. While we are beginning with this foundational tool to collect and display data, we plan to expand this service to be able to help users discover websites based on their previous browsing and be able to easily locate past websites they’ve visited via natural language graph search.
Project Logo

WWAMI Simulation Educator Network

To provide better simulation education to students who receive clinical training in the WWAMI area, the Institute for Simulation and Interprofessional Studies (ISIS) at UW would like to find out the potential simulation educators located across the areas and facilitate communications between them. In our Capstone Project, we analyzed the functional requirements of the potential users and designed a high-fidelity prototype for the simulation educator network with social media features to help ISIS achieve their goals. Our project could be served as a basis for future work to rely on, so that the final product would be built on our requirement analysis and prototype design.

Project Logo

StorySite: Giving The Gary Greaves Oral History Digitization Project Geographical Context

StorySite is an interactive Google map designed for the University of Washington Libraries Special Collections: Gary Greaves Oral History Digitization Project. StorySite connects digital oral histories with their geographical locations and displays them in an accessible and user-friendly manner. Using historical interviews collected by Gary Greaves (d. 2009), an aspiring journalist and author, the project involved interview deselection (choosing from over 153 available recordings), audio editing (cutting,amplifying, and reducing background noise), metadata development (for arranging and displaying the stories by subject), icon selection, website consultation, and Google map implementation (via JavaScript). The recordings selected for this interactive map were cut into 1-3 minute story clips to echo the most important lessons reflected in the complete collection. These interviews, collected in the 1990s, describe multiple perspectives of the development Seattle went through during the 1950s-90s. This information provides an untold perspective of the history of Seattle that deserves our attention.